Skip To Content
Spelman College Faculty Stories

Faculty Stories

Lisa Hibbard Continues to Explore the Flipped Classroom

April 2018

Lisa HibbardLisa Hibbard, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry, is becoming a highly regarded thought leader in the area of "Flipped learning" --  an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom.  Dr. Hibbard and her work were recently featured in Scientia, a research publication that connects people, scientists, educators, policy-makers, researchers, and the public and private sectors.

The article, "Actively Learning Chemistry: Blended Classes for First Year College Students," details how Hibbard has been testing new flipped learning strategies for first-year general chemistry classes at Spelman.

"My chemical education research focuses on using active learning techniques in a flipped learning college introductory chemistry course sequence,’ says Dr Hibbard. ‘The flipped learning environment is simply described as doing school work at home, which leaves time to do homework in class," Hibbard stated in the Scientia article.

Dr. Hibbard is also the author of the article in the Journal of Chemical Education titled, “Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence,” The paper, co-authored with Shannon Sung, Ph.D., assistant professor in the education studies program, reported on a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of this pedagogy on student learning outcomes in the general chemistry courses taught by Dr. Hibbard.

She has presented this work at numerous conferences, including the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education and the SoTL Commons Conference, and has also run workshops on using the flipped learning format at educational conferences including the IRACDA Conference and two Teaching Professor Conferences.

She received funding for the work through an NSF Targeted Infusion Grant, on which she served as a co-PI along with Leyte Winfield, Ph.D, associate professor in the  Department of Chemistry.