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In Memoriam

We Will Always Remember...

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across the United States and around the globe, some members of the Spelman Community and Friends of the College have lost their lives to the deadly disease. We stand in solidarity with each of you who have lost a friend, classmate, professor or loved one. We endeavor to honor and celebrate the lives of the Spelman Community. Please help us by using the form below to inform us about those impacted.

Spelman Celebrates the Life and Legacy of Civil Rights Icon Joseph E. Lowery

The Rev. Joseph E. LowerySpelman College celebrates the life of civil rights champion and Spelman National Community Service Award recipient the Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery. His strength, courage and commitment to justice will continue to change lives through the work of the Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute located at Clark Atlanta University.

Called the "Dean of the Civil Rights Movement," Lowery, 98, died on Friday, March 27, 2020. He was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the Rev. Martin Luther King and much more.

"He was a champion for civil rights, a challenger of injustice, a dear friend to the King family," the King Center tweeted. Additionally, "Dr. Lowery had assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his nine decades: leader, pastor, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate," the Institute said in a statement.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6, 1921, Rev. Lowery, in the 1950s, headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association, the organization that led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations, according to the Institute.

In 1965, King picked Lowery to chair the delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery march to Alabama's governor, George Wallace. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Lowery's legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

In 2009, President Barack Obama awarded Lowery the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, on August 12, 2009. The award was granted  in recognition of Lowery's "lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity." 

Over the years, a number of Spelman students have served as fellows at the Institute and explored social justice issues in a variety of contexts. According to its website, the Lowery Institute was created to empower, inspire and train current and future leaders to improve their communities locally, nationally and internationally...for the common good." 

Rev. Lowery is survived by his three daughters, Yvonne Kennedy, Karen Lowery and Cheryl Lowery-Osborne. 

Help Us  Honor Those Who Lost Their Lives to COVID-19

The list above includes the names or profiles of Spelman Community members of which we are aware. If you know of additional Spelman Community members we should include on this list, please share their information with us and we will add their names.

Sending love and comfort to you all.
Be safe. Stay Well. Remain Undaunted.

  
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Leaders, Legends and Legacies...

Spelman Celebrates the Life and Legacy of Civil Rights Icon Joseph E. Lowery

March 2020

The Rev. Joseph E. LowerySpelman College celebrates the life of civil rights champion and Spelman National Community Service Award recipient the Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery. His strength, courage and commitment to justice will continue to change lives through the work of the Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute located at Clark Atlanta University.

Called the "Dean of the Civil Rights Movement," Lowery, 98, died on Friday, March 27, 2020. He was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the Rev. Martin Luther King and much more.

"He was a champion for civil rights, a challenger of injustice, a dear friend to the King family," the King Center tweeted. Additionally, "Dr. Lowery had assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his nine decades: leader, pastor, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate," the Institute said in a statement.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6, 1921, Rev. Lowery, in the 1950s, headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association, the organization that led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations, according to the Institute.

In 1965, King picked Lowery to chair the delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery march to Alabama's governor, George Wallace. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Lowery's legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

In 2009, President Barack Obama awarded Lowery the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, on August 12, 2009. The award was granted  in recognition of Lowery's "lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity." 

Over the years, a number of Spelman students have served as fellows at the Institute and explored social justice issues in a variety of contexts. According to its website, the Lowery Institute was created to empower, inspire and train current and future leaders to improve their communities locally, nationally and internationally...for the common good." 

Rev. Lowery is survived by his three daughters, Yvonne Kennedy, Karen Lowery and Cheryl Lowery-Osborne.