Academics: Majors and Programs

Education Studies Program Events

Join Public Broadcasting Atlanta and Spelman College for a Free Film Screening of '180 Days: Hartsville'

When: Monday, March 16, 2015
Time: 
6:30 p.m. - Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Where: 
The Camille Olivia Hanks Cosby, Ed.D.
Academic Center Auditorium 
GPS Address: 440 Westview Drive, Atlanta,Georgia 30314
Parking at Spelman College is $3 per vehicle.
RSVP for Film Screening

About the Film

Spelman Hosts 180 Days HartsvilleAn inspiring new documentary, "80 Days: Hartsville takes a fresh look at the nation's poverty and education challenges from a rural South Carolina town triumphing in the face of extraordinary challenges. 

Viewers will experience a year in the life of one Southern town’s efforts to address the urgent demand for reform in American public schools, and watch what happens when the systems that can either fuel or diffuse that reform – bureaucracy, economic opportunity, and fixed mindsets – interact and intersect.

Is Hartsville an anomaly, or do its successes point towards some transferrable and sustainable solutions? Can a community really change the fortunes of a generation by doubling down on their neighborhood schools? Or does the stark reality of the 21st century global economy outweigh the impact of one rural town’s efforts to prepare its children to compete in that economy? "

Q&A With Jacquie Jones Immediately Following the Screening

Spelman Host Screening of 180 HartsvilleDirector and executive producer, Jacquie Jones, will be available for a Q&A immediately following the screening. Jones and co-director Garland McLaurin are the team behind the Peabody Award-winning documentary, and "for more than a year, the pair filmed in two elementary schools struggling with new curriculum standards and maintaining funding, while meeting the needs of individual students. South Carolina ranks 45th in the country in education. The majority of Hartsville residents hover on the poverty line with a median income of less than $30,000 and more than half of the city’s students qualify for free and reduced-price school lunches," according to an article by Black Public Media.  Read More >>

Download the Discussion Guide